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definition - Articulation_(music)

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Articulation (music)

                   
  Examples of articulations. From left to right: staccato, staccatissimo, martellato, marcato, tenuto.
  Articulations from legato to staccatissimo. About this sound Legato, About this sound Portato, About this sound Staccato, About this sound Staccatissimo

In music, articulation refers to the musical direction performance technique which affects the transition or continuity on a single note or between multiple notes or sounds.

Contents

  Types of articulations

There are many types of articulation, with each having a different effect on how the note is played. Some articulation marks include the slur, phrase mark, staccato, staccatissimo, accent, sforzando, rinforzando, and legato. Each articulation is represented by a different symbol placed above or below the note (depending on its position on the staff).

Tenuto Hold the note in question its full length (or longer, with slight rubato), or play the note slightly louder.
Marcato Indicates a note, chord, or passage to be played louder or more forcefully than surrounding music.
Staccato Signifies a note of shortened duration
Legato Indicates musical notes are to be played or sung smoothly and connected.

  Procedure

  Brass and woodwind instruments

Woodwind and brass instruments generally produce articulations by tonguing, the use of the tongue to break the airflow into the instrument.

For the use of the student musician in attempting to master articulations, certain palette cues may be given. For example, the use of the syllable "dah" is often used to demonstrate the correct placement of the tongue to articulate. In most cases, using the near tip of the tongue, as in the syllable "dah," is the preferred articulation. However, different articulation markings require different tongue placement. Smooth, connected passages may require an articulation more reminiscent of the syllable "la," while heavy, sharp notes may be attacked with an articulation similar to "tah."

Furthermore, the implementation of double-tonguing may be required when many articulations are required in rapid succession. Double-tonguing can be simulated by repeating the syllables "dig" and "guh" in rapid succession. Other syllables for double tonguing are "tuh" and "kuh," "tih" and "kuh," and any other combination of syllables that utilize the tip of the tongue behind the front teeth and then the back of the tongue against the back of the mouth. Double-tonguing is an articulation primarily used by brass players, however, the use of double-tonguing by woodwind players is becoming more common.

A third, rare form of articulation for wind players is referred to as "doodle tonguing." The name of this articulation comes from the sound, doodle, one would make if he were to sound his voice while performing the articulation. Doodle-tonguing is achieved by moving the tip of the tongue up and down quickly to block the air stream momentarily on the way up, and again on the way down.

  Bowed instruments

Bowed stringed instruments use different bowing techniques to achieve different articulations.

  Compound articulations

Occasionally, articulations can be combined to create stylistically or technically correct sounds. For example, when staccato marks are combined with a slur, the result is portato, also known as articulated legato. Tenuto markings under a slur are called (for bowed strings) hook bows. This name is also less commonly applied to staccato or martellato (martelé) markings.

  Apagados

Apagados (from the Spanish verb apagar, "to mute") refers to notes that are played dampened or "muted," without sustain. The term is written above or below the notes with a dotted or dashed line drawn to the end of the group of notes that are to be played dampened. The technique is chiefly written for bowed or plucked instruments. Modernists refer to the apogado as "palm mute." On the guitar, the musician dampens the strings with the palm of the hand and plucks with the thumb. Strictly speaking, the term dampened is correct for this effect in music; since to mute means to silence. Illustration of the apagados may be found in the work of composer for Spanish guitar, Gerardo de Altona. See: http://www.mednetconnection.com/18051/18020.html

  See also

  Bibliography

   
               

 

All translations of Articulation_(music)


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