» 
Arabic Bulgarian Chinese Croatian Czech Danish Dutch English Estonian Finnish French German Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Italian Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Malagasy Norwegian Persian Polish Portuguese Romanian Russian Serbian Slovak Slovenian Spanish Swedish Thai Turkish Vietnamese
Arabic Bulgarian Chinese Croatian Czech Danish Dutch English Estonian Finnish French German Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Italian Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Malagasy Norwegian Persian Polish Portuguese Romanian Russian Serbian Slovak Slovenian Spanish Swedish Thai Turkish Vietnamese

definitions - Electronic_warfare

electronic warfare (n.)

1.military action involving the use of electromagnetic energy to determine or exploit or reduce or prevent hostile use of the electromagnetic spectrum

   Advertizing ▼

definition (more)

definition of Wikipedia

synonyms - Electronic_warfare

electronic warfare (n.)

EW

   Advertizing ▼

analogical dictionary


electronic warfare (n.)


Wikipedia

Electronic warfare

                   
For warfare on the Internet, see Cyberwarfare.

Warfare
Military history

Portal  

Electronic warfare (EW) refers to any action involving the use of the electromagnetic spectrum or directed energy to control the spectrum, attack an enemy, or impede enemy assaults via the spectrum. The purpose of electronic warfare is to deny the opponent the advantage of, and ensure friendly unimpeded access to, the EM spectrum. EW can be applied from air, sea, land, and space by manned and unmanned systems, and can target communication, radar, or other services. EW includes three major subdivisions: Electronic Attack (EA), Electronic Protection (EP), and Electronic warfare Support (ES).[1]

Contents

  The electromagnetic environment

Military operations are executed in an information environment increasingly complicated by the electromagnetic (EM) spectrum. The electromagnetic spectrum portion of the information environment is referred to as the electromagnetic environment (EME). The recognized need for military forces to have unimpeded access to and use of the electromagnetic environment creates vulnerabilities and opportunities for electronic warfare (EW) in support of military operations.[1]

Within the information operations construct, EW is an element of information warfare; more specifically, it is an element of offensive and defensive counterinformation.[2]

  Electronic warfare applications

Electronic warfare is any military action involving the use of the EM spectrum to include directed energy (DE) to control the EM spectrum or to attack an enemy. This is not limited to radio or radar frequencies but includes IR, visible, ultraviolet, and other less used portions of the EM spectrum. This includes self-protection, standoff, and escort jamming, and antiradiation attacks. EW is a specialized tool that enhances many air and space functions at multiple levels of conflict.[2]

The purpose of EW is to deny the opponent an advantage in the EM spectrum and ensure friendly unimpeded access to the EM spectrum portion of the information environment. EW can be applied from air, sea, land, and space by manned and unmanned systems. EW is employed to support military operations involving various levels of detection, denial, deception, disruption, degradation, protection, and destruction.[1]

EW contributes to the success of information operations (IO) by using offensive and defensive tactics and techniques in a variety of combinations to shape, disrupt, and exploit adversarial use of the EM spectrum while protecting friendly freedom of action in that spectrum. Expanding reliance on the EM spectrum increases both the potential and the challenges of EW in information operations. All of the core, supporting, and related information operations capabilities either directly use EW or indirectly benefit from EW.[2]

The principal EW activities have been developed over time to exploit the opportunities and vulnerabilities that are inherent in the physics of EM energy. Activities used in EW include: electro-optical, infrared and radio frequency countermeasures; EM compatibility and deception; EM hardening, interference, intrusion, and jamming; electronic masking, probing, reconnaissance, and intelligence; electronics security; EW reprogramming; emission control; spectrum management; and wartime reserve modes.[1][2]

  Subdivisions

  RAF Menwith Hill, a large ECHELON site in the United Kingdom, and part of the UK-USA Security Agreement

Electronic warfare includes three major subdivisions: electronic attack (EA), electronic protection (EP), and electronic warfare support (ES).[1]

Electronic attack involves the use of EM energy, directed energy, or antiradiation weapons to attack personnel, facilities, or equipment with the intent of degrading, neutralizing, or destroying enemy combat capability.

Electronic protection involves actions taken to protect personnel, facilities, and equipment from any effects of friendly or enemy use of the electromagnetic spectrum that degrade, neutralize, or destroy friendly combat capability.

Electronic warfare support is the subdivision of EW involving actions tasked by, or under direct control of, an operational commander to search for, intercept, identify, and locate or localize sources of intentional and unintentional radiated EM energy for the purpose of immediate threat recognition, targeting, planning, and conduct of future operations.[1] These measures begin with systems designed and operators trained to make Electronic Intercepts (ELINT) and then classification and analysis broadly known as Signals intelligence from such detections to return information and perhaps actionable intelligence (e.g. a ship's identification from unique characteristics of a specific radar) to the commander.

  Electronic warfare support

Electronic Warfare Support (ES), is the subdivision of EW involving actions tasked by, or under direct control of, an operational commander to search for, intercept, identify, and locate or localize sources of intentional and unintentional radiated electromagnetic (EM) energy for the purpose of immediate threat recognition, targeting, planning, and conduct of future operations.[1]

An overlapping discipline, signals intelligence (SIGINT) is the related process of analyzing and identifying the intercepted frequencies (e.g. as a mobile phone or RADAR). SIGINT is broken into three categories: ELINT, COMINT, and FISINT.

The distinction between intelligence and electronic warfare support (ES) is determined by who tasks or controls the collection assets, what they are tasked to provide, and for what purpose they are tasked. Electronic warfare support is achieved by assets tasked or controlled by an operational commander. The purpose of ES tasking is immediate threat recognition, targeting, planning and conduct of future operations, and other tactical actions such as threat avoidance and homing. However, the same assets and resources that are tasked with ES can simultaneously collect intelligence that meets other collection requirements.[1]

Where these activities are under the control of an operational commander and being applied for the purpose of situational awareness, threat recognition, or EM targeting, they also serve the purpose of Electronic Warfare surveillance (ES).

  Electronic attack

Electronic attack (EA) or electronic countermeasures (ECM) involves the use of electromagnetic energy, or counter-electromagnetic radiation weapons to attack personnel, facilities, or equipment with the intention of directly affecting, degrading, neutralizing, or destroying an enemy's combat capability (see Joint Publication [JP] 3-09, Joint Fire Support).[1]

EA operations can be detected by an adversary depending on his level of technological sophistication and paranoia. Many modern EA techniques are considered to be highly classified. Examples of EA include communications jamming, IADS suppression, DE/LASER attack, expendable decoys (e.g., flares and chaff), and radio controlled improvised explosive device (RCIED) systems.

  Electronic protection

  A right front view of a USAF Boeing E-4 advanced airborne command post (AABNCP) on the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) simulator (HAGII-C) for testing.

Electronic Protection (EP) (previously known as electronic protective measures (EPM) or electronic counter countermeasures (ECCM)) involves actions taken to protect personnel, facilities, and equipment from any effects of friendly or enemy use of the electromagnetic spectrum that degrade, neutralize, or destroy friendly combat capability. Jamming is not part of EP, it is an EA measure.

The use of flare rejection logic on an IR missile to counter an adversary’s use of flares is EP. While defensive EA actions and EP both protect personnel, facilities, capabilities, and equipment, EP protects from the effects of EA (friendly and/or adversary). Other examples of EP include spread spectrum technologies, use of Joint Restricted Frequency List (JRFL), emissions control (EMCON), and low observability or "stealth".[1]

An Electronic Warfare Tactics Range (EWTR) is a practice range which provides for the training of aircrew in electronic warfare. There are two such ranges in Europe; one at RAF Spadeadam in the United Kingdom and the POLYGON range in Germany and France. EWTRs are equipped with ground-based equipment to simulate electronic warfare threats that aircrew might encounter on missions.

  See also

Electronic Warfare Systems:

Historic:

US specific:

  Further reading

  References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Joint Publication 3-13.1 Electronic Warfare" (Online PDF available for download). Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) - Armed Forces of the United States of America. January 25, 2007. pp. i, v - x. http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/dod/jp3-13-1.pdf. Retrieved 2011-05-01. "This publication provides...doctrine for electronic warfare planning, preparation, execution, and assessment in support of joint operations across the range of military operations." 
  2. ^ a b c d "Electronic Warfare; Air Force Doctrine Document 2-5.1" (Online PDF available for download). Secretary of the Air Force. November 5, 2002. pp. i, v - x. http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/service_pubs/afd2_5_1.pdf. Retrieved 2011-05-01. "This AFDD establishes operational doctrine for United States Air Force EW operations. This doctrine provides guidance for planning and conducting electronic warfare operations in support of national and joint force commander (JFC) campaign objectives." 

  General references


   
               

 

All translations of Electronic_warfare


sensagent's content

  • definitions
  • synonyms
  • antonyms
  • encyclopedia

Dictionary and translator for handheld

⇨ New : sensagent is now available on your handheld

   Advertising ▼

sensagent's office

Shortkey or widget. Free.

Windows Shortkey: sensagent. Free.

Vista Widget : sensagent. Free.

Webmaster Solution

Alexandria

A windows (pop-into) of information (full-content of Sensagent) triggered by double-clicking any word on your webpage. Give contextual explanation and translation from your sites !

Try here  or   get the code

SensagentBox

With a SensagentBox, visitors to your site can access reliable information on over 5 million pages provided by Sensagent.com. Choose the design that fits your site.

Business solution

Improve your site content

Add new content to your site from Sensagent by XML.

Crawl products or adds

Get XML access to reach the best products.

Index images and define metadata

Get XML access to fix the meaning of your metadata.


Please, email us to describe your idea.

WordGame

The English word games are:
○   Anagrams
○   Wildcard, crossword
○   Lettris
○   Boggle.

Lettris

Lettris is a curious tetris-clone game where all the bricks have the same square shape but different content. Each square carries a letter. To make squares disappear and save space for other squares you have to assemble English words (left, right, up, down) from the falling squares.

boggle

Boggle gives you 3 minutes to find as many words (3 letters or more) as you can in a grid of 16 letters. You can also try the grid of 16 letters. Letters must be adjacent and longer words score better. See if you can get into the grid Hall of Fame !

English dictionary
Main references

Most English definitions are provided by WordNet .
English thesaurus is mainly derived from The Integral Dictionary (TID).
English Encyclopedia is licensed by Wikipedia (GNU).

Copyrights

The wordgames anagrams, crossword, Lettris and Boggle are provided by Memodata.
The web service Alexandria is granted from Memodata for the Ebay search.
The SensagentBox are offered by sensAgent.

Translation

Change the target language to find translations.
Tips: browse the semantic fields (see From ideas to words) in two languages to learn more.

last searches on the dictionary :

2957 online visitors

computed in 0.078s

   Advertising ▼

I would like to report:
section :
a spelling or a grammatical mistake
an offensive content(racist, pornographic, injurious, etc.)
a copyright violation
an error
a missing statement
other
please precise:

Advertize

Partnership

Company informations

My account

login

registration

   Advertising ▼

An Illustrated Guide to Spy Planes and Electronic Warfare Aircraft (3.97 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Information Warfare: Chaos on the Electronic Superhighway Schwartau, Winn Paper (3.99 USD)

Commercial use of this term

World Electronic Warfare Aircraft (8.74 USD)

Commercial use of this term

605 page ELECTRONIC WARFARE EW Engineer Handbook CD (11.99 USD)

Commercial use of this term

USAF Air Force Patch: 513th Electronic Warfare Squadron - 3" (5.95 USD)

Commercial use of this term

287 pg. EW Electronic Warfare & Radar Manual CD (11.99 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Tactical Electronic Warfare (Guidance for employment) (15.0 USD)

Commercial use of this term

1992 Wings of Fire #50 Navy EA-6A Prowler Electronic Warfare Plane (0.99 USD)

Commercial use of this term

1960s Vintage USAF SAC Electronic Warfare Old Crows Pin (12.75 USD)

Commercial use of this term

AIR FORCE BLACK OPS AREA 51 ELECTRONIC WARFARE DIRECTORATE EW MILITARY PATCH NEW (7.95 USD)

Commercial use of this term

16622) Patch VMAQ-2 Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron USMC Military (9.99 USD)

Commercial use of this term

EW Design Engineer's Handbook 1987 ELECTRONIC WARFARE * (13.99 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Information Warfare: Chaos on the Electronic Superhighway 1994 by Sch 1560250801 (4.48 USD)

Commercial use of this term

U.S. Air Force 16th Electronic Warfare Squadron Patch (5.99 USD)

Commercial use of this term

ORIGINAL - 53D ELECTRONIC WARFARE GROUP - DETACHMENT 1 -- USAF SPACE PATCH (14.95 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Navy Electronic's Warfare Technician Rate 5.5" Sticker (7.49 USD)

Commercial use of this term

French Army Signal/ASA Badge 785th Electronic Warfare Co. (5.99 USD)

Commercial use of this term

USAF AIR FORCE BLACK OPS NUTCRACKERS 413 FLIGHT TEST SQ ELECTRONIC WARFARE PATCH (5.95 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Navy Electronics Warfare Technician EW 5.5" Die Cut Sticker / Decal (7.49 USD)

Commercial use of this term