» 
Arabic Bulgarian Chinese Croatian Czech Danish Dutch English Estonian Finnish French German Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Italian Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Malagasy Norwegian Persian Polish Portuguese Romanian Russian Serbian Slovak Slovenian Spanish Swedish Thai Turkish Vietnamese
Arabic Bulgarian Chinese Croatian Czech Danish Dutch English Estonian Finnish French German Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Italian Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Malagasy Norwegian Persian Polish Portuguese Romanian Russian Serbian Slovak Slovenian Spanish Swedish Thai Turkish Vietnamese

definition - Entertainment_Tonight

definition of Wikipedia

   Advertizing ▼

Wikipedia

Entertainment Tonight

                   
Entertainment Tonight
Entertainment Tonight Logo.png

2007-2008 season logo for Entertainment Tonight
Format News
Created by Al Masini
Presented by Mark Steines (2004–present)
Nancy O'Dell (2011–present)
Country of origin United States
Language(s) English
No. of seasons 30
Production
Executive producer(s) Linda Bell Blue
Producer(s) Kaylee Stacey
Running time 30 minutes
Production company(s) Paramount Television (1981-2006)
in association with:
Cox Broadcasting (1981-1997)
Taft Entertainment Television (1981-1987)
Great American Broadcasting (1987-1991)
TeleRep (1981-1991) CBS Paramount Television (2006-2007)
CBS Television Distribution (2007-present)
Distributor Paramount Television (1981-2006)
CBS Paramount Television (2006-2007)
CBS Television Distribution (2007-present)
Broadcast
Original channel Syndicated
Picture format 480i (SDTV) (1981–2008)
1080i (HDTV) (2008–present)
Original run September 14, 1981 – present
External links
Website

Entertainment Tonight is a daily tabloid television entertainment television news show that is syndicated by CBS Television Distribution throughout the United States, Canada (on Global) and in many countries around the world. Linda Bell Blue is currently the program's executive producer. The program makes the claim that it is "the most watched entertainment newsmagazine in the world" (though by what measures this claim is verified is unknown). It is the longest-running entertainment news program, with its first broadcast on September 14, 1981, and was the first syndicated program distributed via satellite. The primary anchor since 1982 had been Mary Hart, who exited the show on May 20, 2011. Mark Steines and Nancy O'Dell took on the roles of primary hosts of the show once Hart left.

It was announced on January 30, 2006, that Entertainment Tonight has been renewed through the 2011–2012 season, which will be the show's 30th season. On September 8, 2008, Entertainment Tonight began to air in high definition with the move of the program from their longtime home at Stage 28 on the Paramount Pictures studio lot to Stage 4 at CBS Studio Center, one of the final steps involving the incorporation of Paramount's former syndication arm, Paramount Domestic Television, into CBS' distribution arms and the adoption of the CBS Television Distribution name, which all took place following the breakup of the original Viacom in 2005.[1]

In its early years, ET was co-produced with TeleRep (who left after 1991), Cox Broadcasting (who left after 1997), and Taft/Great American Broadcasting (who left after 1991). Paramount Domestic Television would later absorb syndication companies that the latter two had once owned: Rysher Entertainment (formerly owned by Cox) and Worldvision Enterprises (formerly owned by Taft/Great American).

Contents

  Overview

  Format

In its current form, Entertainment Tonight airs as half of a one-hour entertainment news block that also includes a spin-off, The Insider. Three versions of the show are compiled and made available to broadcasters: a "standalone" version, a version for stations that air The Insider just beforehand, and one for those that air The Insider immediately after. Recently, only the "standalone" version is aired, even on stations that air ET and The Insider back-to-back (or vice-versa).

ET Weekend (formerly known as Entertainment This Week), a one-hour weekend edition, is also produced. Originally a recap of the week's news, most or all episodes later transitioned to have some sort of special theme; though the weekend edition has begun to use either format, most commonly editions showing replays of stories that were shown during the previous week's editions, depending on the episode. ET Radio Minute, a daily radio feature, is syndicated by Westwood One.

Composed of breaking news stories, exclusive set visits, first looks at upcoming film and television projects, and one-on-one interviews with Hollywood talents and celebrities, ET's regular segments include "The Latest News," a quick round up of the day's biggest stories; "Story from Studio 4," a lengthier analysis of Hollywood's hottest topics; "Real or Rumor," where rumors circulating Hollywood are confirmed or denied.

  Background

Veteran television producer Alfred Masini, coming off his success with the 1980 debut of Solid Gold, was the program's creator. Richard Frank, president of Paramount Television, his vice president of programming, John E. Goldhammer, and his vice president of development, Mel Harris, hired managers and producers from local news stations such as original managing editor Jim Bellows, formerly of the Los Angeles Herald Examiner. Early on, Frank, Goldhammer, and Harris held many discussions with producers, writers, and directors about what kind of program ET should be. Although the pilot was executive produced by Jack Haley Jr., Andy Friendly was hired as the show's first producer. (Haley still remained on as executive consultant.) He left the show after 6 weeks and Goldhammer took it over. Goldhammer established the program's unique look, sound, pace and reporting style. Friendly put together a diverse staff ranging from former rock roadies to veteran television reporters of the Vietnam War era—some of whom continued to work on the show for more than twenty years. In 1982, Goldhammer hired Mary Hart and Leeza Gibbons to host the daily and weekend shows.

  Controversy

In the early years, Entertainment Tonight, following a local newscast format, consisted primarily of coverage of the latest movies, music, and television. During Bellows' years the series also developed a series of investigative reports about Hollywood's drug use and hiring practices; but during the 1996–97 season ET began to include more sensational fare, featuring paid exclusive interviews with controversial and infamous newsmakers of the day, including disgraced Olympic figure skater Tonya Harding, who became notorious for her role in the conspiracy to physically attack rival Nancy Kerrigan at a 1994 U.S. Figure Skating Championships practice session; Amy Fisher, who appeared with Joey and Mary Jo Buttafuoco, reunited after Fisher's infamous assault on Mrs. Buttafuoco; convicted child molester Mary Kay Letourneau, who married Vili Fualaau;[2] and attorney Howard K. Stern, from the Anna Nicole Smith paternity controversy.[3][4] ET has also aired exclusive stories related to Anna Nicole Smith, including coverage of her funeral, and her surviving daughter.[5]

In 1996, actor George Clooney decided to boycott Entertainment Tonight to protest the presence of intrusive paparazzi after Hard Copy did an exposé about his love life, violating an agreement he had with Paramount, which produced both shows.[6] In a letter he sent to Paramount, Clooney stated that he would encourage his friends to do the same.[7] Although Clooney has since ended his boycott, Entertainment Tonight has continued to broadcast video and photography taken by celebrity-stalking paparazzi, with some of the staff of Hard Copy absorbed into the staff of Entertainment Tonight after that program's 1999 cancellation.

  Hosts

Entertainment Tonight is currently hosted by Mark Steines and Nancy O'Dell with several correspondents, including Chris Jacobs and Christina McLarty. Leonard Maltin is the film correspondent and reviewer for the show, while Andre Leon Talley covers the Hollywood fashion industry and red carpet events.

  Special correspondents

Entertainment Tonight has many special correspondents who report on particular features for the show, usually having had a role in the program they work on. Paula Abdul was a special correspondent for ET's coverage of American Idol, and Dancing with the Stars had correspondents for the second season (Tatum O'Neal), third season (Lisa Rinna), fifth season (Donny Osmond), ninth season (Marie Osmond) and eleventh season (Niecy Nash). Diane Diamond is a special correspondent for high-profile trials; she featured coverage of the investigation following Michael Jackson's death in June 2009. Adam Lambert was the fashion correspondent at the 2010 Grammys. Melissa Rycroft was a special correspondent covering parties, award shows, and premieres.

  Current on-air staff

  Anchors

  Correspondents

  • Chris Jacobs - correspondent & fill-in anchor (2011–present)
  • Christina McLarty - correspondent (2011–present)
  • Leonard Maltin - film correspondent (1982–present)
  • Andre Leon Talley - fashion correspondent (2012–present)

  Former on-air staff

  Entertainment Tonight in other countries

  • Entertainment Tonight UK, hosted by Irish celebrity Amanda Byram, launched in January 2005 on satellite/cable pay TV channel Sky One, which additionally airs each US episode a day or two after its American showing.
  • An Australian version was produced by Australia's Nine Network during the 1990s, presented by Richard Wilkins and Marie Patane, with journalist Terry Willesee as guest host. The show was a mix of locally produced stories and those imported from the American program. It ended in 2000 and was replaced by the American version. The American show is now shown on the cable channel Arena with its sister program The Insider, On 30 June 2012 the Nine Network has been removed after 30 years of airing Entertainment Tonight since 1982 till 2012, however it will continue airing ET on pay TV channel Arena.
  • Entertainment Tonight was aired in France under the name Exclusif, hosted by Thierry Clopeau (1998), Emmanuelle Gaume (1998–2000), Flavie Flament (2000–2001), Valérie Bénaïm (2001–2002) and Frédéric Joly (1998–2002). There were several correspondents like Ness, Stéphanie Pillonca, Génie Godula and Jonathan Lambert.
  • In Brazil, there is a version of Entertainment Tonight called TV Fama (TV Fame) hosted by Nelson Rubens and Flávia Noronha.
  • In India, the show began airing with a special broadcast from November 29, 2010 on Big CBS Prime.

  Competition

Despite stiff competition from Access Hollywood, Extra, TMZ, its own "sister" program The Insider, Inside Edition, Showbiz Tonight, and E! News, Entertainment Tonight remains one of the top 10 highest-rated syndicated programs. As of the fall of 2007, its daytime TV rankings were fluctuating between fourth and fifth place due to competition from fellow CBS-syndicated program Judge Judy.[8][9]

  Footnotes

  External links

   
               

 

All translations of Entertainment_Tonight


sensagent's content

  • definitions
  • synonyms
  • antonyms
  • encyclopedia

Dictionary and translator for handheld

⇨ New : sensagent is now available on your handheld

   Advertising ▼

sensagent's office

Shortkey or widget. Free.

Windows Shortkey: sensagent. Free.

Vista Widget : sensagent. Free.

Webmaster Solution

Alexandria

A windows (pop-into) of information (full-content of Sensagent) triggered by double-clicking any word on your webpage. Give contextual explanation and translation from your sites !

Try here  or   get the code

SensagentBox

With a SensagentBox, visitors to your site can access reliable information on over 5 million pages provided by Sensagent.com. Choose the design that fits your site.

Business solution

Improve your site content

Add new content to your site from Sensagent by XML.

Crawl products or adds

Get XML access to reach the best products.

Index images and define metadata

Get XML access to fix the meaning of your metadata.


Please, email us to describe your idea.

WordGame

The English word games are:
○   Anagrams
○   Wildcard, crossword
○   Lettris
○   Boggle.

Lettris

Lettris is a curious tetris-clone game where all the bricks have the same square shape but different content. Each square carries a letter. To make squares disappear and save space for other squares you have to assemble English words (left, right, up, down) from the falling squares.

boggle

Boggle gives you 3 minutes to find as many words (3 letters or more) as you can in a grid of 16 letters. You can also try the grid of 16 letters. Letters must be adjacent and longer words score better. See if you can get into the grid Hall of Fame !

English dictionary
Main references

Most English definitions are provided by WordNet .
English thesaurus is mainly derived from The Integral Dictionary (TID).
English Encyclopedia is licensed by Wikipedia (GNU).

Copyrights

The wordgames anagrams, crossword, Lettris and Boggle are provided by Memodata.
The web service Alexandria is granted from Memodata for the Ebay search.
The SensagentBox are offered by sensAgent.

Translation

Change the target language to find translations.
Tips: browse the semantic fields (see From ideas to words) in two languages to learn more.

last searches on the dictionary :

2843 online visitors

computed in 0.109s

I would like to report:
section :
a spelling or a grammatical mistake
an offensive content(racist, pornographic, injurious, etc.)
a copyright violation
an error
a missing statement
other
please precise:

Advertize

Partnership

Company informations

My account

login

registration

   Advertising ▼