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definitions - Oracle

oracle (n.)

1.a shrine where an oracular god is consulted

2.a prophecy (usually obscure or allegorical) revealed by a priest or priestess; believed to be infallible

3.an authoritative person who divines the future

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Merriam Webster

OracleOr"a*cle (?), n. [F., fr. L. oraculum, fr. orare to speak, utter, pray, fr. os, oris, mouth. See Oral.]


1. The answer of a god, or some person reputed to be a god, to an inquiry respecting some affair or future event, as the success of an enterprise or battle.

Whatso'er she saith, for oracles must stand. Drayton.

2. Hence: The deity who was supposed to give the answer; also, the place where it was given.

The oracles are dumb;
No voice or hideous hum
Runs through the arched roof in words deceiving.
Milton.

3. The communications, revelations, or messages delivered by God to the prophets; also, the entire sacred Scriptures -- usually in the plural.

The first principles of the oracles of God. Heb. v. 12.

4. (Jewish Antiq.) The sanctuary, or Most Holy place in the temple; also, the temple itself. 1 Kings vi. 19.

Siloa's brook, that flow'd
Fast by the oracle of God.
Milton.

5. One who communicates an oracle{1} or divine command; an angel; a prophet.

God hath now sent his living oracle
Into the world to teach his final will.
Milton.

6. Any person reputed uncommonly wise; one whose decisions are regarded as of great authority; as, a literary oracle.Oracles of mode.” Tennyson.

The country rectors . . . thought him an oracle on points of learning. Macaulay.

7. A wise pronouncement or decision considered as of great authority.

OracleOr"a*cle, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Oracled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Oracling (?).] To utter oracles. [Obs.]

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synonyms - Oracle

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-BMW Oracle Racing • Dark Oracle • Delphian oracle • Eyes of the Oracle • Geoff Maltby a.k.a. The Oracle • Granule (Oracle DBMS) • HMS Oracle • HMS Oracle (S16) • Internet Oracle • Ladies Love Oracle (album) • Lady Oracle • List of Dark Oracle episodes • List of acquisitions by Oracle • Los Angeles Oracle • Machine oracle • Mallory's Oracle • My Oracle Lives Uptown • Nechung Oracle • ORACLE (computer) • ORACLE (teletext) • Odessey and Oracle • Odyssey and Oracle • Oracle (Kittie) • Oracle (Marvel Comics) • Oracle (Michael Hedges album) • Oracle (Sunn O))) album) • Oracle (album) • Oracle (comics) • Oracle (computability) • Oracle (computer science) • Oracle (disambiguation) • Oracle (rocket) • Oracle (software testing) • Oracle 10g • Oracle Adaptive Access Manager • Oracle Advanced Queuing • Oracle Application Development Framework • Oracle Application Express • Oracle Application Framework • Oracle Application Integration Architecture • Oracle Application Server • Oracle Applications • Oracle Applications Users Group • Oracle Arena • Oracle BI Publisher • Oracle BI server • Oracle BPEL Process Manager • Oracle Beehive • Oracle Business Intelligence Suite Enterprise Edition • Oracle C++ Call Interface • Oracle CRM • Oracle Call Interface • Oracle Card • Oracle Certification Program • Oracle Clinical • Oracle Clusterware • Oracle Collaboration Suite • Oracle Complex MRO • Oracle ConText • Oracle Corp • Oracle Corp. • Oracle Corporation • Oracle DBMS • Oracle Data Guard • Oracle Data Mining • Oracle Database • Oracle Designer • Oracle Developer Suite • Oracle Discoverer • Oracle E-Business Suite • Oracle Education Foundation • Oracle Encyclopædia • Oracle Enterprise Linux • Oracle Enterprise Manager • Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center • Oracle Enterprise Metadata Manager • Oracle Enterprise Service Bus • Oracle Financial Services Software • Oracle Financials • Oracle Flashback • Oracle Forms • Oracle Fusion Applications • Oracle Fusion Middleware • Oracle General Ledger • Oracle HTTP Server • Oracle Identity Management • Oracle Imaging and Process Management • Oracle Information Rights Management • Oracle Internet Directory • Oracle Jinitiator • Oracle LogMiner • Oracle Management Server • Oracle Media Objects • Oracle Media Server • Oracle Migration Workbench • Oracle Net Services • Oracle Night • Oracle OLAP • Oracle Office • Oracle OpenWorld • Oracle PowerBrowser • Oracle Property Manager • Oracle RAC • Oracle Rdb • Oracle Recovery Manager • Oracle Reports • Oracle SOA Suite • Oracle SQL Developer • Oracle Spatial • Oracle State Park • Oracle Streams • Oracle Technology Network • Oracle Template Library • Oracle Tower Bucharest • Oracle Ultra Search • Oracle Unified Method • Oracle User Group • Oracle VM • Oracle Warehouse Builder • Oracle WebCenter • Oracle WebLogic Server • Oracle at Delphi • Oracle bone • Oracle bone script • Oracle bones • Oracle cards • Oracle class • Oracle hrms • Oracle interMedia • Oracle machine • Oracle metadata • Oracle of Time • Oracle of omaha • Oracle of the Lamb • Oracle of the Potter • Oracle payments • Oracle's Queen • Oracle, Arizona • Random oracle • Random oracle model • Rec.humor.oracle • San Francisco Oracle • Sun acquisition by Oracle • Tears of the Oracle • The Forest Oracle • The Oracle (Sully Erna album) • The Oracle (Sweet Valley) • The Oracle (The Matrix) • The Oracle (University of South Florida) • The Oracle (novel) • The Oracle J2EE Companion • The Oracle and the Mountains • The Oracle of Delphi • The Oracle of Hi-Fi • The Oracle of Reason • The Oracle with Max Keiser • The Oracle, Queensland • The Oracle, Reading • USS ORACLE • USS Oracle • USS Oracle (AM-103)

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Wikipedia - see also

Wikipedia

Oracle

                   
  "Consulting the Oracle" by John William Waterhouse, showing eight priestesses in a temple of prophecy

In Classical Antiquity, an oracle was a person or agency considered to be a source of wise counsel or prophetic predictions or precognition of the future, inspired by the gods. As such it is a form of divination.

The word oracle comes from the Latin verb ōrāre "to speak" and properly refers to the priest or priestess uttering the prediction. In extended use, oracle may also refer to the site of the oracle, and to the oracular utterances themselves, called khrēsmoi (χρησμοί) in Greek.

Oracles were thought to be portals through which the gods spoke directly to people. In this sense they were different from seers (manteis, μάντεις) who interpreted signs sent by the gods through bird signs, animal entrails, and other various methods.[1]

The most important oracles of Greek antiquity were Pythia, priestess to Apollo at Delphi, and the oracle of Dione and Zeus at Dodona in Epirus. Other temples of Apollo were located at Didyma on the coast of Asia Minor, at Corinth and Bassae in the Peloponnese, and at the islands of Delos and Aegina in the Aegean Sea. Only the Delphic Oracle was a female; all others were male.[2] The Sibylline Oracles are a collection of oracular utterances written in Greek hexameters ascribed to the Sibyls, prophetesses who uttered divine revelations in a frenzied state.

Contents

  Origins

Walter Burkert observes that "Frenzied women from whose lips the god speaks" are recorded in the Near East as in Mari in the second millennium BC and in Assyria in the first millennium BC.[3] In Egypt the goddess Wadjet (eye of the moon) was depicted as a snake-headed woman or a woman with two snake-heads. Her oracle was in the renowned temple in Per-Wadjet (Greek name Buto). The oracle of Wadjet may have been the source for the oracular tradition which spread from Egypt to Greece.[4] Evans linked Wadjet with the Minoan snake goddess, a chthonic deity and one of the aspects of the Great Mother.[5]

In Greece the old oracles were devoted to the Mother Goddess. At the oracle of Dodona she will be called Diōnē (the feminine form of Diós, genitive of Zeus, PIE *Dyaeus; or of dīos, "godly", literally "heavenly"), who represents the earth-fertile soil, probably the chief female goddess of the PIE pantheon. Python, daughter (or son) of Gaia was the earth dragon of Delphi represented as a serpent and became the chthonic deity, enemy of Apollo, who slew her and possessed the oracle.[6]

  Pythia

Pythia, the oracle at Delphi, only gave prophecies the seventh day of each month, seven being the number most associated with Apollo, during the nine warmer months of the year; thus, Delphi was not the major source of divination for the ancient Greeks. Many wealthy individuals bypassed the hordes of people attempting a consultation by making additional animal sacrifices to please the oracle lest their request go unanswered. As a result, seers were the main source of everyday divination.

The temple was changed to a center for the worship of Apollo during the classical period of Greece and priests were added to the temple organization—although the tradition regarding prophecy remained unchanged—and the apparently always-female priestess continued to provide the services of the oracle exclusively. It is from this institution that the English word, oracle, is derived.

The Delphic Oracle exerted considerable influence throughout Hellenic culture. Distinctively, this female was essentially the highest authority both civilly and religiously in male-dominated ancient Greece. She responded to the questions of citizens, foreigners, kings, and philosophers on issues of political impact, war, duty, crime, laws—even personal issues.[7] Nevertheless there was a catch. The Pythia, when about to deliver, would chew leaves from Apollo's sacred laurel tree and would then sit on her holy tripod, seated in the innermost sanctum, over a crack on the rock from where noxious volcanic fumes emanated. Dazed and disoriented, she would then be "possessed by the voice of Apollo" and utter inarticulate sounds before fainting. Only the priests were present there, and they had the task of "translating" her utterances in plain speech. The priests were extremely well versed on the various matters of state, as part of their work was to debrief pilgrims about all that they knew. In addition, no question to the god was ever dealt with immediately. After the query was submitted, several days of prescribed ceremonial had to be observed before Apollo was so satisfied as to speak through his priestess, which gave the priests precious time for research.

The semi-Hellenic countries around the Greek world, such as Lydia, Caria, and even Egypt also respected her and came to Delphi as supplicants.

Croesus, king of Lydia beginning in 560 B.C., tested the oracles of the world to discover which gave the most accurate prophecies. He sent out emissaries to seven sites who were all to ask the oracles on the same day what the king was doing at that very moment. Croesus proclaimed the oracle at Delphi to be the most accurate, who correctly reported that the king was making a lamb-and-tortoise stew, and so he graced her with a magnitude of precious gifts.[8] He then consulted Delphi before attacking Persia, and according to Herodotus was advised, "If you cross the river, a great empire will be destroyed." Believing the response favorable, Croesus attacked, but it was his own empire that ultimately was destroyed by the Persians.

She allegedly also proclaimed Socrates to be the wisest man in Greece, to which Socrates said that, if so, this was because he alone was aware of his own ignorance. After this confrontation, Socrates dedicated his life to a search for knowledge that was one of the founding events of western philosophy. He claimed that she was "an essential guide to personal and state development."[9] This Oracle's last recorded response was given in 393 AD, when the emperor Theodosius I ordered pagan temples to cease operation.[citation needed]

The oracle's powers were highly sought after and never doubted. Any inconsistencies between prophecies and events were dismissed as failure to correctly interpret the responses, not an error of the oracle.[10] Very often prophecies were worded ambiguously, so as to cover all contingencies - especially so ex post facto. One famous such response to a query about participation in a military campaign was "You will go you will return never in war will you perish". This gives the recipient liberty to place a comma before or after the word "never", thus covering both possible outcomes. Another was the response to the Athenians when the vast army of king Xerxes I was approaching Athens with the intent of razing the city to the ground. "Only the wooden palisades may save you"[citation needed], answered the oracle, probably aware that there was sentiment for sailing to the safety of southern Italy and reestablishing Athens there. Some thought that it was a recommendation to fortify the Acropolis with a wooden fence and make a stand there. Others, Themistocles among them, said the oracle was clearly for fighting at sea, the metaphor intended to mean war ships. Others still insisted that their case was so hopeless that they should board every ship available and flee to Italy, where they would be safe beyond any doubt. In the event, variations of all three interpretations were attempted: some barricaded the Acropolis, the civilian population was evacuated over sea to nearby Salamis Island and to Troizen, and the war fleet fought victoriously at Salamis Bay. Should utter destruction have happened, it could always be claimed that the oracle had called for fleeing to Italy after all.

  Dodona

Dodona was another oracle devoted to the Mother Goddess identified at other sites with Rhea or Gaia, but here called Dione. The shrine of Dodona was the oldest Hellenic oracle, according to the fifth-century historian Herodotus and in fact, dates to pre-Hellenic times, perhaps as early as the second millennium BC when the tradition probably spread from Egypt. Zeus displaced the Mother goddess and assimilated her as Aphrodite.

It became the second most important oracle in ancient Greece, which later was dedicated to Zeus and to Heracles during the classical period of Greece.At Dodona Zeus was worshipped as Zeus Naios or Naos (god of springs Naiads,from a spring which existed under the oak), and Zeus Bouleos (cancellor). Priestesses and priests interpreted the rustling of the oak leaves to determine the correct actions to be taken.The oracle was shared by Dione and Zeus.

  Trophonius

Trophonius was an oracle at Lebadea of Boeotia devoted to the chthonian Zeus Trophonius. Trophonius is derived from the Greek word "trepho" (nourish) and he was a Greek hero, or demon or god. Demeter-Europa was his nurse.[11] Europa (in Greek: broad-eyes) was a Phoenecian princess who Zeus transformed into a white bull abducted and carried her to Creta, and is equated with Astarte as a moon goddess by ancient sources.[12] Some scholars connect Astarte with the Minoan snake goddess, whose cult as Aphrodite spread from Creta to Greece.[13]

  "Oracles" in other cultures

The term "oracle" is also applied to parallel institutions of divination in other cultures. Specifically, it is used in the context of Christianity for the concept of divine revelation, and in the context of Judaism for the Urim and Thummim breastplate, and in general any utterance considered prophetic.[14]

  China

Oracles were common in many civilizations of antiquity. In China, the use of oracle bones dates as far back as the Shang Dynasty, (1600–1046 BC). The I Ching, or "Book of Changes", is a collection of linear signs used as oracles that are from that period. Although divination with the I Ching is thought to have originated prior to the Shang Dynasty, it was not until King Wu of Zhou (1046–1043 BC) that it took its present form. In addition to its oracular power, the I Ching has had a major influence on the philosophy, literature and statecraft of China from the time of the Zhou Dynasty (1122 BC – AD 256).

  Celtic polytheism

In Celtic polytheism, divination was performed by the priestly caste, either the druids or the vates. This is reflected in the role of "seers" in Dark Age Wales (dryw) and Ireland (fáith).

  Hinduism

In ancient India, the oracle was known as Akashwani or Asariri (Tamil), literally meaning "voice from the sky" and was related to the message of god. Oracles played key roles in many of the major incidents of the epics Mahabharata and Ramayana. An example is that Kamsa (or Kansa), the evil uncle of lord Krishna, was informed by an oracle that the eighth son of his sister Devaki would kill him. There are still a few existing and publicly accessible oracles in India.

  Tibetan Buddhism

In Tibet, oracles have played, and continue to play, an important part in religion and government. The word "oracle" is used by Tibetans to refer to the spirit that enters those men and women who act as media between the natural and the spiritual realms. The media are, therefore, known as kuten, which literally means, "the physical basis".

The Dalai Lama, who lives in exile in northern India, still consults an oracle known as the Nechung Oracle, which is considered the official state oracle of the government of Tibet. The Dalai Lama has according to custom, a custom that has endured for centuries, consulted the Nechung Oracle during the new year festivities of Losar.[15] Nechung and Gadhong are the primary oracles currently consulted; former oracles such as Karmashar and Darpoling are no longer active in exile. Another oracle the Dalai Lama consults is the Tenma oracle, for which a young Tibetan woman is the medium for the goddess. The Dalai Lama gives a complete description of the process of trance and spirit possession in his book Freedom in Exile. [1].

  Pre-Columbian Americas

In the migration myth of the Mexitin, i.e., the early Aztecs, a mummy-bundle (perhaps an effigy) carried by four priests directed the trek away from the cave of origins by giving oracles. An oracle led to the foundation of Mexico-Tenochtitlan. The Yucatec Mayas knew oracle priests or chilanes, literally 'mouthpieces' of the deity. Their written repositories of traditional knowledge, the Books of Chilam Balam, were all ascribed to one famous oracle priest who correctly had predicted the coming of the Spaniards and its associated disasters.

  Sub-Saharan Africa

The Igbo people of southeastern Nigeria in Africa have a long tradition of using oracles. In Igbo villages, oracles were usually female priestesses to a particular deity, usually dwelling in a cave or other secluded location away from urban areas, and, much as the oracles of ancient Greece, would deliver prophecies in an ecstatic state to visitors seeking advice. Two of their ancient oracles became especially famous during the pre-colonial period: the Agbala oracle at Awka and the Chukwu oracle at Arochukwu.[16] Though the vast majority of Igbos today are Christian, many of them still use oracles.

Amongst the related Yoruba peoples of the same country, the Babalawos (and their female counterparts, the Iyanifas) serve collectively as the principal aspects of the tribe's World-famous Ifa divination system. Due to this, they customarily officiate at a great many of its traditional and religious ceremonies.

  Norse mythology

In Norse mythology, Odin took the severed head of the mythical god Mimir to Asgard for consultation as an oracle. The Havamal and other sources relate the sacrifice of Odin for the oracular Runes whereby he lost an eye (external sight) and won wisdom (internal sight; insight). to be a consulted oracle

  Hawaii

In Hawaii, oracles were found at certain heiau. These oracles were found in towers covered in white kapa. In here, priests received the will of gods. These towers were called "'Anu'u." An example of this can be found at Ahu'ena heiau in Kona. http://gohawaii.about.com/od/bigislandofhawaiiphotos/ig/kailua-kona/kailua_kona_038.htm

  References

  1. ^ Flower, Michael Attyah. The Seer in Ancient Greece. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2008.
  2. ^ Broad, W. J. (2007), p.19
  3. ^ Walter Burkert.Greek Religion. Harvard University Press.1985.p 116-118
  4. ^ Herodotus ii 55,and vii 134.
  5. ^ Cristopher L.C. Whitcomp.Minoan Snake goddess.8.Snakes, Egypt, Magic and women
  6. ^ Hymn to Pythian Apollo.363,369
  7. ^ Broad, W. J. (2007), p.43
  8. ^ Broad, W. J. (2007), p.51-53
  9. ^ Broad, W. J. (2007), p.63. Socrates also argued that the oracle's effectiveness was rooted in her ability to abandon herself completely to a higher power by way of insanity or "sacred madness."
  10. ^ Broad, W. J. (2007), p.15
  11. ^ Pausanias.Guide to Greece 9.39.2-5.
  12. ^ Lucian of Samosata.De Dea Syria.4
  13. ^ R.Wunderlich.The secret of Creta.Efstathiadis Group.Athens 1987.p 134
  14. ^ OED s.v. "oracle n."
  15. ^ Gyatso, Tenzin (1988). Freedom in Exile: the Autobiography of the Dalai Lama of Tibet. Fully revised and updated. Lancaster Place, London, UK: Abacus Books (A Division of Little, Brown and Company UK). ISBN 0-349-11111-1. p.233
  16. ^ Webster J.B. and Boahen A.A., The Revolutionary Years, West Africa since 1800, Longman, London, p. 107–108.

  Further reading

  External links

   
               

 

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