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definitions - discrimination

discrimination (n.)

1.unfair treatment of a person or group on the basis of prejudice

2.the cognitive process whereby two or more stimuli are distinguished

Discrimination (n.)

1.(MeSH)Differential response to different stimuli.

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Merriam Webster

DiscriminationDis*crim`i*na"tion (?), n. [L. discriminatio the contrasting of opposite thoughts.]
1. The act of discriminating, distinguishing, or noting and marking differences.

To make an anxious discrimination between the miracle absolute and providential. Trench.

2. The state of being discriminated, distinguished, or set apart. Sir J. Reynolds.

3. (Railroads) The arbitrary imposition of unequal tariffs for substantially the same service.

A difference in rates, not based upon any corresponding difference in cost, constitutes a case of discrimination. A. T. Hadley.

4. The quality of being discriminating; faculty of nicely distinguishing; acute discernment; as, to show great discrimination in the choice of means.

5. That which discriminates; mark of distinction.

Syn. -- Discernment; penetration; clearness; acuteness; judgment; distinction. See Discernment.

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definition (more)

definition of Wikipedia

synonyms - discrimination

Discrimination (n.) (MeSH)

Discrimination (Psychology)  (MeSH)

discrimination (n.)

difference, discernment, neglect, perception, refinement, secernment, favoritism  (American), favouritism  (British)

see also - discrimination

discrimination (n.)

favor, favour, give preference to

phrases

-African-American discrimination in the U.S. Military • Age Discrimination Act of 1975 • Age Discrimination in Employment Act • Airline sex discrimination policy controversy • American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee • Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 • Anti-Romanian discrimination • Anti-discrimination law • Austrian litigation association of NGOs against discrimination • Campaign Against Racial Discrimination • Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women • Committee on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women • Committee on the Elimination of all forms of Racial Discrimination • Convention against Discrimination in Education • Convention for the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women • Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women • Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination • Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination • Data discrimination • Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination • Declaration on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women • Directive 2000/43/EC on Anti-discrimination • Disability Discrimination Act 1992 • Disability Discrimination Act 1995 • Disability discrimination act • Discrimination (Employment and Occupation) Convention, 1958 • Discrimination against atheists • Discrimination against the homeless • Discrimination and National Security Initiative • Discrimination learning • Discrimination testing • Economic discrimination • Employment Non-Discrimination Act • Employment discrimination • Employment discrimination law in the United States • Fighting Discrimination • Freedom from discrimination • Gender discrimination in Pakistan • Genetic discrimination • Group Against Racial Discrimination (Fiji) • High authority for the struggle against discrimination and for equality • Housing discrimination • Hungarian discrimination against Roma • Institutional discrimination • Institutional discrimination in the United States housing market • Institutionalized discrimination • International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination • International Year of Mobilization against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance • International convention on the elimination of all forms of racial discrimination • Linguistic discrimination • List of US ballot initiatives to repeal LGBT anti-discrimination laws • List of anti-discrimination acts • Markovian discrimination • Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination • Mentalism (discrimination) • Mixed motive discrimination • Mortgage discrimination • National Council for Combating Discrimination • Ombudsman against Discrimination on Grounds of Sexual Orientation (Sweden) • Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women • Pregnancy discrimination • Price discrimination • Prohibition of Discrimination in Products, Services and Entry into Places of Entertainment and Public Places Law, 2000 • Prohibition of discrimination • Property Discrimination • Racial Discrimination Act 1975 • Racial Discrimination against Burmese Indians • Racism and discrimination in Ukraine • Racist discrimination • Regional discrimination in China • Religious discrimination • Religious discrimination against Neopagans • Reverse discrimination • Sectarian Discrimination • Sex Discrimination (Election Candidates) Act 2002 • Sex Discrimination Act • Sex Discrimination Act 1975 • Sex Discrimination Act 1984 • Sex Discrimination Commissioner • Society Against Sexual Orientation Discrimination • Soldier discrimination • Sub-Commission on Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of Minorities • Tactile discrimination • Term Discrimination • The Promotion of Equality and the Prevention of Unfair Discrimination Act 2000 • Two-point discrimination • United Kingdom employment discrimination law • United Nations Convention for the Elimination of All Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) • Xenophobe (discrimination)

analogical dictionary





Wikipedia

Discrimination

                   

Discrimination is the prejudicial treatment of an individual based on their membership - or perceived membership - in a certain group or category. It involves the groups initial reaction or interaction, influencing the individuals actual behavior towards the group or the group leader, restricting members of one group from opportunities that are available to a group, leading to the exclusion of the individual or entities based on logical or irrational decision making as for the Solo persons profile is discriminated based on a bias or a logical reason. .[1]

Discriminatory laws such as redlining exist in many countries. In some places, controversial attempts such as racial quotas have been used to redress negative effects of discrimination, but in turn have sometimes been called reverse discrimination themselves.

Contents

  Etymology

The term "discrimination" began to be used as an expression of derogatory racial prejudice in the 1830s from Thomas D. Rice's performances as "Jim Crow".[citation needed] Since the American Civil War the term "discrimination" generally evolved in American English usage as an understanding of prejudicial treatment of an individual based solely on their race, later generalized as membership in a certain socially undesirable group or social category.[2] "Discrimination" derives from Latin, where the verb discrimire' means "to separate, to distinguish, to make a distinction".

  Definitions

Moral philosophers have defined discrimination as disadvantageous treatment or consideration. This is a comparative definition. An individual need not be actually harmed in order to be discriminated against. He or she just needs to be treated worse than others for some arbitrary reason. If someone decides to donate to help orphan children, but decides to donate less, say, to black children out of a racist attitude, he or she will be acting in a discriminatory way even if he or she actually benefits the people he discriminates against by donating some money to them.[3]

Based on realistic conflict theory[4] and social identity theory,[5] Rubin and Hewstone[6] have highlighted a distinction between three types of discrimination:

  1. Realistic competition is driven by self-interest and is aimed at obtaining material resources (e.g., food, territory, customers) for the in-group (e.g., favouring an in-group in order to obtain more resources for its members, including the self).
  2. Social competition is driven by the need for self-esteem and is aimed at achieving a positive social status for the in-group relative to comparable out-groups (e.g., favouring an in-group in order to make it better than an out-group).
  3. Consensual discrimination is driven by the need for accuracy[clarification needed] and reflects stable and legitimate intergroup status hierarchies (e.g., favouring a high status in-group because it is high status).

The United Nations stance on discrimination includes a statement that "Discriminatory behaviors take many forms, but they all involve some form of exclusion or rejection."[7]

  Racial and ethnic discrimination

  An African-American child at a segregated drinking fountain on a courthouse lawn, North Carolina, 1938.

Racial discrimination differentiates between individuals on the basis of real and perceived racial differences, and has been official government policy in several countries, such as Papua New Guinea in the apartheid era.

In the United States, racial profiling of minorities by law enforcement officials has been called racial discrimination.[8] As early as 1866, the Civil Rights Act provided a remedy for intentional race discrimination in employment by private employers and state and local public employers.

The Civil Rights Act of 1871 applies to public employment or employment involving state action prohibiting deprivation of rights secured by the federal constitution or federal laws through action under color of law. Title VII is the principal federal statute with regard to employment discrimination prohibiting unlawful employment discrimination by public and private employers, labor organizations, training programs and employment agencies based on race or color, religion, gender, and national origin.

  A racist sign on a beach in Durban under the South African apartheid laws (1989)

Title VII also prohibits retaliation against any person for opposing any practice forbidden by statute, or for making a charge, testifying, assisting, or participating in a proceeding under the statute. The Civil Rights Act of 1991 expanded the damages available in Title VII cases and granted Title VII plaintiffs the right to a jury trial. Title VII also provides that race and color discrimination against every race and color is prohibited.

Within the criminal justice system in some Western countries, minorities are convicted and imprisoned disproportionately when compared with whites.[9][10] In 1998, nearly one out of three black men between the ages of 20-29 were in prison or jail, on probation or parole on any given day in the United States.[11] Native Americans make up about 2% of Canada's population, but account for 18% of the federal prison population as of 2000.[12] According to the Australian government's June 2006 publication of prison statistics, Aborigenes make up 24% of the overall prison population in Australia.[13]

In 2004, Māori made up just 15% of the total population of New Zealand but 49.5% of prisoners. Māori were entering prison at 8 times the rate of non-Māori.[14] A quarter of the people in England's prisons are from an ethnic minority. The Equality and Human Rights Commission found that five times more black people than white people per head of population in England and Wales are imprisoned. Experts and politicians said over-representation of black men was a result of decades of racial prejudice in the criminal justice system.[15]

  Discrimination on the basis of nationality

Discrimination on the basis of nationality is usually included in employment laws[16] (see below section for employment discrimination specifically). It is sometimes referred to as bound together with racial discrimination[17] although it can be separate. It may vary from laws that stop refusals of hiring based on nationality, asking questions regarding origin, to prohibitions of firing, forced retirement, compensation and pay, etc. based on nationality.[17]

Discrimination on the basis of nationality may show as a "level of acceptance" in a sport or work team regarding new team members and employees that differ from the nationality of the majority of team members.[18]

  Sex, gender, and gender identity discrimination

Though gender discrimination and sexism refers to beliefs and attitudes in relation to the gender of a person, such beliefs and attitudes are of a social nature and do not, normally, carry any legal consequences. Sex discrimination, on the other hand, may have legal consequences.

Though what constitutes sex discrimination varies between countries, the essence is that it is an adverse action taken by one person against another person that would not have occurred had the person been of another sex. Discrimination of that nature is considered a form of prejudice and in certain enumerated circumstances is illegal in many countries.

Sexual discrimination can arise in different contexts. For instance an employee may be discriminated against by being asked discriminatory questions during a job interview, or by an employer not hiring or promoting, unequally paying, or wrongfully terminating, an employee based on their gender.

  Median weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers, by sex, race, and ethnicity, U.S., 2009.[19]

In an educational setting there could be claims that a student was excluded from an educational institution, program, opportunity, loan, student group, or scholarship due to their gender. In the housing setting there could be claims that a person was refused negotiations on seeking a house, contracting/leasing a house or getting a loan based on their gender. Another setting where there have been claims of gender discrimination is banking; for example if one is refused credit or is offered unequal loan terms based on one’s gender.[20]

Another setting where there is usually gender discrimination is when one is refused to extend their credit, refused approval of credit/loan process, and if there is a burden of unequal loan terms based on one’s gender.

Socially, sexual differences have been used to justify different roles for men and women, in some cases giving rise to claims of primary and secondary roles.[21]

While there are alleged non-physical differences between men and women, major reviews of the academic literature on gender difference find only a tiny minority of characteristics where there are consistent psychological differences between men and women, and these relate directly to experiences grounded in biological difference.[22] However, there are also some psychological differences in regard to how problems are dealt with and emotional perceptions and reactions which may relate to hormones and the successful characteristics of each gender during longstanding roles in past primitive lifestyles.

Unfair discrimination usually follows the gender stereotyping held by a society.[23]

The United Nations had concluded that women often experience a "glass ceiling" and that there are no societies in which women enjoy the same opportunities as men.[24] The term "glass ceiling" is used to describe a perceived barrier to advancement in employment based on discrimination, especially sex discrimination.[25]

In the United States in 1995, the Glass Ceiling Commission, a government-funded group, stated: "Over half of all Master’s degrees are now awarded to women, yet 95% of senior-level managers, of the top Fortune 1000 industrial and 500 service companies are men. Of them, 97% are white." In its report, it recommended affirmative action, which is the consideration of an employee's gender and race in hiring and promotion decisions, as a means to end this form of discrimination.[26] In 2008, women accounted for 51% of all workers in the high-paying management, professional, and related occupations. They outnumbered men in such occupations as public relations managers; financial managers; and human resource managers.[27]

The China's leading headhunter, Chinahr.com, reported in 2007 that the average salary for white-collar men was 44,000 yuan ($6,441), compared with 28,700 yuan ($4,201) for women.[28]

The PwC research found that among FTSE 350 companies in the United Kingdom in 2002 almost 40% of senior management posts were occupied by women. When that research was repeated in 2007, the number of senior management posts held by women had fallen to 22%.[29]

Transgender individuals, both male to female and female to male, often experience problems which often lead to dismissals, underachievement, difficulty in finding a job, social isolation, and, occasionally, violent attacks against them. Nevertheless, the problem of gender discrimination does not stop at transgender individuals or with women. Men are often the victim in certain areas of employment as men begin to seek work in office and childcare settings traditionally perceived as "women's jobs". One such situation seems to be evident in a recent case concerning alleged YMCA discrimination and a Federal Court Case in Texas.[citation needed] The case actually involves alleged discrimination against both men and blacks in childcare, even when they pass the same strict background tests and other standards of employment. It is currently being contended in federal court, as of fall 2009, and sheds light on how a workplace dominated by a majority (women in this case) sometimes will seemingly "justify" whatever they wish to do, regardless of the law. This may be done as an effort at self-protection, to uphold traditional societal roles, or some other faulty, unethical or illegal prejudicial reasoning.

Discrimination in slasher films is relevant. Gloria Cowan had a research group study on 57 different slasher films. Their results showed that the non-surviving females were more frequently sexual than the surviving females and the non-surviving males. Surviving as a female slasher victim was strongly associated with the absence of sexual behavior. In slasher films, the message appears to be that sexual women get killed and only the pure women survive. Slasher films reinforce the idea that female sexuality can be costly.[30]

  Legislation

Australia

Canada

Hong Kong

  • Sex Discrimination Ordinance (1996)

United Kingdom

United States

  Caste discrimination

According to UNICEF and Human Rights Watch, caste discrimination affects an estimated 250 million people worldwide.[34][35][36] Discrimination based on caste, as perceived by UNICEF, is prevalent mainly in parts of Asia (India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Japan) and Africa.[34] Currently, there are an estimated 160 million Dalits or Scheduled Castes (formerly known as "untouchables") in India.[37][38].In India * Ambedkar controversial cartoon issue rocked the parliament on may,2012 which is a symbol of modern discrimination based on caste.

  Sexual orientation discrimination

  Protests in New York City against Uganda's Anti-Homosexuality Bill.

One’s sexual orientation is a “predilection for homosexuality, heterosexuality, or bisexuality”.[39] Like most minority groups, homosexuals and bisexuals are not immune to prejudice and discrimination from the majority group. They may experience hatred from others because of their sexual preferences; a term for such hatred based upon one’s sexual orientation is often called homophobia. Many continue to hold negative feelings towards those with non-heterosexual orientations and will discriminate against people who have them or are thought to have them.

In 2009, ILGA published a report based on research carried out by Daniel Ottosson at Södertörn University College, Stockholm, Sweden. This research found that of the 80 countries around the world that continue to consider homosexuality illegal, five carry the death penalty for homosexual activity, and two do in some regions of the country.[40] In the report, this is described as "State sponsored homophobia".[41] This happens in Islamic states, or in two cases regions under Islamic authority.[42][43]

On February 5, 2005 the IRIN issued a reported titled "Iraq: Male homosexuality still a taboo." The article stated, among other things that honor killings by Iraqis against a gay family member are common and given some legal protection.[44] In August 2009 Human Rights Watch published an extensive report detailing torture of men accused of being gay in Iraq, including the blocking of men's anuses with glue and then giving the men laxatives.[45] In South Africa, same-sex unions are often condemned as "un-African."[46] Research shows 86% of black lesbians from the Western Cape live in fear of sexual assault.[47]

A number of countries, especially those in the Western world, have passed measures to alleviate discrimination against sexual minorities, including laws against anti-gay hate crimes and workplace discrimination. Some have also legalized same-sex marriage or civil unions in order to grant same-sex couples the same protections and benefits as opposite-sex couples.

  Religious discrimination

Religious discrimination is valuing or treating a person or group differently because of what they do or do not believe. For instance, the indigenous Christian population of Balkans (known as "rayah" or "protected flock") lived under the Ottoman Kanun–i–Rayah. The word is sometimes translated as 'cattle' rather than 'flock' or 'subjects' to emphasize the inferior status of the rayah.[48]

Restrictions upon Jewish occupations were imposed by Christian authorities. Local rulers and church officials closed many professions to Jews, pushing them into marginal roles considered socially inferior, such as tax and rent collecting and moneylending, occupations only tolerated as a "necessary evil".[49] The number of Jews permitted to reside in different places was limited; they were concentrated in ghettos and were not allowed to own land. The Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 decreed that Jews and Muslims must wear distinguishing clothing.[50]

In a 1979 consultation on the issue, the United States commission on civil rights defined religious discrimination in relation to the civil rights guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. Whereas religious civil liberties, such as the right to hold or not to hold a religious belief, are essential for Freedom of Religion (in the United States secured by the First Amendment), religious discrimination occurs when someone is denied " the equal protection of the laws, equality of status under the law, equal treatment in the administration of justice, and equality of opportunity and access to employment, education, housing, public services and facilities, and public accommodation because of their exercise of their right to religious freedom."[51]

  Disability discrimination

Discrimination against people with disabilities in favor of people who are not is called ableism or disablism.[by whom?][citation needed] Disability discrimination, which treats non-disabled individuals as the standard of ‘normal living’, results in public and private places and services, education, and social work that are built to serve 'standard' people, thereby excluding those with various disabilities.[citation needed]

In the United States, the Americans with Disabilities Act mandates the provision of equality of access to both buildings and services and is paralleled by similar acts in other countries, such as the Equality Act 2010 in the UK.[citation needed]

  Language discrimination

Diversity of language is protected and respected by most nations who value cultural diversity.[dubious ] However, people are sometimes subjected to different treatment because their preferred language is associated with a particular group, class or category. Commonly, the preferred language is just another attribute of separate ethnic groups.[dubious ] Discrimination exists if there is prejudicial treatment against a person or a group of people who speak a particular language or dialect.

Language discrimination is suggested to be labeled linguicism or logocism[by whom?] Anti-discriminatory and inclusive efforts to accommodate persons who speak different languages or cannot have fluency in the country's predominant or "official" language, is bilingualism such as official documents in two languages, and multiculturalism in more than two languages.[citation needed]

  Employment discrimination

  Ethiopian Jews protest in Israel over non-employment of Ethiopian academics.

Employment discrimination refers to disabling certain people to apply and receive jobs based on their race, age, gender, religion, height, weight, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or gender identity. In relationship to sociology, employment discrimination usually relates to what events are happening in society at the time. For example, it would have seemed ludicrous to hire an African American male and absolutely unheard of to hire an African American woman over 50 years ago.[clarification needed][citation needed] However, in our society[specify] today, it is the absolute norm to hire any qualified person.[citation needed]

Many laws prohibit employment discrimination. If a person uses discriminatory hiring practices, they can be sued for hate crimes. However, some minority groups (notably LGBT people) remain unprotected by U.S. federal law from employment discrimination.

The American federal laws that protect against:

Most other western nations have similar laws protecting these groups.

  Reverse discrimination

  Students protesting against racial quotas in Brazil: "Quer uma vaga? Passe no vestibular!" ("Do you want a university place? Be successful in the entrance exam!")

Some attempts at antidiscrimination have been criticized as reverse discrimination. In particular, minority quotas (for example, affirmative action) discriminate against members of a dominant or majority group. In its opposition to race preferences, the American Civil Rights Institute's Ward Connerly stated, "There is nothing positive, affirmative, or equal about 'affirmative action' programs that give preference to some groups based on race."[52] There are cases, however, such as the Noack v. YMCA case in U.S. Fifth Circuit Court, which include outright anti-male gender bias in a traditionally female work environment like childcare. That former employee claims to have suffered even physical assaults, and was allegedly also told to not hire too many blacks or men.[citation needed]

  Theories

  Discrimination

Social theories such as Egalitarianism claim that social equality should prevail. In some societies, including most developed countries, each individual's civil rights include the right to be free from government sponsored social discrimination.[53] Due to a belief in the capacity to perceive pain and/or suffering shared by all animals, 'abolitionist' or 'vegan' egalitarianism maintains that the interests of every individual (regardless its species), warrant equal consideration with the interests of humans, and that not doing so is "speciesist".[54]

  Conservative and anarcho-capitalist

In contrast, conservative writer and law professor Matthias Storme has claimed that the freedom of discrimination in human societies is a fundamental human right, or more precisely, the basis of all fundamental freedoms and therefore the most fundamental freedom. Author Hans-Hermann Hoppe, in an essay[55] about his book Democracy: The God That Failed, asserts that a natural social order is characterized by increased discrimination. The views of the two aforementioned do not, of course, represent all people who either call themselves "conservative" or are so-called, for example, economist Thomas Sowell,who is "conservative", expounds no such radical or extreme sentiments.

  Labeling theory

Discrimination, in labeling theory, takes form as mental categorization of minorities and the use of stereotype. This theory describes difference as deviance from the norm, which results in internal devaluation and social stigma[56] that may be seen as discrimination. It is started by describing a 'natural' social order. It is distinguished between the fundamental principle of fascism and social democracy. The Nazis in 1930's-era Germany, the pre-1990 Apartheid government of South Africa used racial discriminatory agendas for their political ends. This practice continues with some present day governments.

  State discrimination vs. free market discrimination

  State discrimination

In politics, the dominating part of the population rules. Therefore, the worst discrimination in the history has been committed by states. For example, the anti-semitic practices of the Nazi-Germany would not have happened in free markets, because they would have caused losses.[57]

However, government officials and politicians need not care about losses as much as companies, which decreases their incentive not to discriminate. For example, around 1900 African-Americans started to compete for jobs that had previously been all-white. Officials, voted in by white majorities, changed the hiring rules for the federal civil service. Photographs of applicants were made obligatory in civil service job applications, and hiring officials were given discretion to choose between the three top scoring applicants. The number of blacks in federal employment was kept artificially low for decades.[58]

In early 20th century South Africa mine owners preferred hiring black workers because they were cheaper. Then the whites successfully persuaded the government to enact laws that highly restricted the black's rights to work (see Apartheid).[58]

Similarly, to make more profits, producers secretly hired screenwriters who were on Senator Joseph McCarthy's blacklist, which mitigated the effects of the list.[58]

When the "Jim Crow" racial segregation laws were enacted in the U.S., many companies disobeyed them for years, because the market automatically punishes companies that discriminate: they lose customers and get additional expenses. It took 15 years for the government to break down the resistance of the companies.[59]

  Markets punish the discriminator

The Nobel prize winning economist Gary Becker showed in his book The Economics of Discrimination (University of Chicago Press, 1957) how the markets automatically punish the companies that discriminate.[57]

The profitability of the company that discriminates is decreased, and the loss is "directly proportional to how much the employer's decision was based on prejudice, rather than on merit." Indeed, choosing a worker with lower performance (in comparison to salary) causes losses proportional to the difference in performance. Similarly, the customers who discriminate against certain kinds of workers in favor of less effective ones have to pay more for their services, on average.[57]

If a company discriminates, it typically loses profitability and market share to the companies that do not discriminate, unless the state limits free competition protecting the discriminators.[58]

  Scapegoats

Many people blame scapegoats for problems that are not their fault. This is common when two deprived ethnic groups compete with one another for economic rewards. This is normally directed against groups that are relatively powerless, because they make an easy target. It frequently involves projection, which is the unconscious attribution to the others of ones own desires or characteristics.[60]

  See also

  References

  1. ^ Introduction to sociology. 7th ed. New York: W. W. Norton & Company Inc, 2009. page 334. Print.
  2. ^ Introduction to sociology. 7th ed. New York: W. W. Norton & Company Inc, 2009. page 324. Print.
  3. ^ Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen, “Private Discrimination: A Prioritarian, Desert-Accommodating Account”, San Diego Law Review, 43, 817-856 (2006); Oscar Horta, “Discrimination in Terms of Moral Exclusion”, Theoria: Swedish Journal of Philosophy, 76, 346-364 (2010).
  4. ^ Sherif, M. (1967). Group conflict and co-operation. London: Routledge.
  5. ^ Tajfel, H., & Turner, J. C. (1979). An integrative theory of intergroup conflict. In W. G. Austin & S. Worchel (Eds.), The social psychology of intergroup relations (pp. 33–47). Monterey, CA: Brooks/Cole.
  6. ^ 14. Rubin, M., & Hewstone, M. (2004). Social identity, system justification, and social dominance: Commentary on Reicher, Jost et al., and Sidanius et al. Political Psychology, 25, 823-844.
  7. ^ United Nations CyberSchoolBus: What is discrimination?PDF
  8. ^ Callahan, Gene; Anderson, William (2001 August–September). "The Roots of Racial Profiling". Reason Online (Reason Foundation). 
  9. ^ How is the Criminal Justice System Racist?
  10. ^ Blacks Hardest Hit by Incarceration Policy. Human Rights Watch. June 5, 2008.
  11. ^ Race and the Criminal Justice System
  12. ^ Trevethan, Shelley; Rastin, Christopher J. (June 2004). "A Profile of Visible Minority Offenders in the Federal Canadian Correctional System". Research Branch, Correctional Service of Canada. http://www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/rsrch/reports/r144/r144_e.shtml. 
  13. ^ "Prisoners in Australia, 2006". Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2006-12-14. http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4517.0Main+Features12006?OpenDocument. Retrieved 2007-05-04. 
  14. ^ New Zealand's Prison Population
  15. ^ "More black people jailed in England and Wales proportionally than in US". The Guardian. October 11, 2010
  16. ^ Race, Color, National Origin and Ancestry, State of Wisconsin
  17. ^ a b Ken LaMance, Prohibitions Against Race and Nationality
  18. ^ Christiane Schwieren, Mechanisms Underlying Nationality-Based Discrimination in Teams. A Quasi-Experiment Testing Predictions From Social Psychology and Microeconomics, Maastricht University
  19. ^ U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Highlights of Women’s Earnings in 2009. Report 1025, June 2010.
  20. ^ Wilson, F. (2003) Organizational Behaviour and Gender (2nd Edition), Aldershot: Ashgate.
  21. ^ Ridley-Duff, R. J. (2008) "Gendering, Courtship and Pay Equity: Developing Attraction Theory to Understand Work-Life Balance and Entrepreneurial Behaviour", paper to the 31st ISBE Conference, 5th–7th November, Belfast
  22. ^ Hyde, J. S. (2005) “The Gender Similarities Hypothesis”, American Psychologist, 60(6): 581–592.
  23. ^ Raymond F. Gregory, Women and Workplace Discrimination: Overcoming Barriers to Gender Equality, Piscataway, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2003
  24. ^ Cynthia Fuchs Epstein, Glass Ceilings and Open Doors, Fordham Law Review, 64.2, 1995, pp.291-449; Carol Hymowitz and Timothy Schellhardt, The Glass Ceiling: Why Women Can’t Seem to Break the Invisible Barrier that Blocks them from the Top Jobs, The Wall Street Journal, 4, March 24, 1986, pp.10-40
  25. ^ Kenneth Bolton, Joe R. Feagin Black in Blue: African-American Police Officers and Racism, Routledge, 2004
  26. ^ "A Solid Investment: Making Full Use of the Nation's Human Capital". 1995-11. http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1117&context=key_workplace. Retrieved 2008-05-23. 
  27. ^ "Quick Stats on Women Workers, 2008". U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment and Earnings, 2008 Annual Averages and the Monthly Labor Review.
  28. ^ "A Great Leap Backward for China's Women". Newsweek. August 1, 2009.
  29. ^ "Women quit before hitting glass ceiling". Guardian.co.uk. March 8, 2007.
  30. ^ Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named Cowan; see the help page.
  31. ^ Finduslaw.com
  32. ^ Finduslaw.com
  33. ^ "Pregnancy Discrimination Act". http://employment.findlaw.com/employment/employment-employee-discrimination-harassment/employment-employee-pregnancy-discrimination-top/pregnancy-discrimination-act.html. Retrieved 2008-05-14. 
  34. ^ a b Discrimination, UNICEF
  35. ^ Global Caste Discrimination
  36. ^ Caste - The Facts
  37. ^ "The Caste System". NPR: National Public Radio.
  38. ^ "UN report slams India for caste discrimination". CBC News. March 2, 2007.
  39. ^ World English Dictionary, [1] “Sexual Orientation]
  40. ^ "New Benefits for Same-Sex Couples May Be Hard to Implement Abroad". ABC News. June 22, 2009.
  41. ^ ILGA: 2009 Report on State Sponsored Homophobia (2009)
  42. ^ ILGA:7 countries still put people to death for same-sex acts
  43. ^ Homosexuality and Islam - ReligionFacts
  44. ^ IRIN Middle East | Middle East | Iraq | IRAQ: Male homosexuality still a taboo | Human Rights |Feature
  45. ^ "They Want Us Exterminated". Human Rights Watch. August 16, 2009.
  46. ^ "South African gangs use rape to "cure" lesbians". Reuters. March 13, 2009.
  47. ^ "Raped and killed for being a lesbian: South Africa ignores 'corrective' attacks". The Guardian. March 12, 2009.
  48. ^ Maan Z. Madina, Arabic-English Dictionary of the Modern Literary Language, 1973.
  49. ^ "Did Discrimination Enhance Intelligence of Jews?". National Geographic News. July 18, 2005
  50. ^ Medieval Jewish History: An Encyclopedia. Edited by Norman Roth, Routledge
  51. ^ U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, 1979: Religious discrimination. A neglected issue. A consultation sponsored by the United States Commission on Civil Rights, Washington D.C., April 9–10, 1979
  52. ^ American Civil Rights Institute | Press Release
  53. ^ "Civil rights". http://www.weblocator.com/attorney/mn/law/concivrig.html#30. Retrieved 2006. 
  54. ^ Singer, Peter (1999) [1993]. "Equality for Animals?". Practical Ethics (Second ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 57–58. ISBN 0-521-43971-X. "If a being suffers, there can be no moral justification for refusing to take that suffering into consideration. … This is why the limit of sentience…is the only defensible boundary of concern for the interests of others. … Similarly those I would call 'speciesists' give greater weight to their own species when there is a clash between their interests and the interests of those of other species." 
  55. ^ Lewrockwell.com, Hoppe, Hans-Hermann (2001). "Democracy: The God That Failed". http://www.lewrockwell.com/hoppe/hoppe4.html. Retrieved 2006. 
  56. ^ Slattery, M. (2002). Key Ideas in Sociology. Nelson Thornes. pp. 134–137. ISBN 978-0-7487-6565-2. 
  57. ^ a b c The Economics of Discrimination, Robert P. Murphy, Library of Economics, AUGUST 2, 2010
  58. ^ a b c d Discrimination, The Concise Encyclopedia of Economics, Library of Economics
  59. ^ Jennifer Roback, “The Political Economy of Segregation: The Case of Segregated Streetcars.” Journal of Economic History 56, no. 4 (December 1986): 893–917.
  60. ^ Introduction to sociology. 7th ed. New York: W.W. Norton & Company Inc, 2009. Page 324. Print.

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