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definition - isotopic signature

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Isotopic signature

                   

An isotopic signature (also isotopic fingerprint) is a ratio of stable or unstable isotopes of particular elements found in an investigated material. The atomic mass of different isotopes affect their chemical kinetic behavior, leading to natural isotope separation processes.

Isotopic signature is identified by isotope analysis.

Contents

  Carbon isotopes

Algal group δ13C range[1]
HCO3-using red algae −22.5‰ – −9.6‰
CO2-using red algae −34.5‰ – −29.9‰
Brown algae −20.8‰ – −10.5‰
Green algae −20.3‰ – −8.8‰

For example, different sources and sinks of methane have different affinity for the 12C and 13C isotopes, which allows distinguishing between different sources by the 13C/12C ratio in methane in the air. In geochemistry, paleoclimatology and paleoceanography this ratio is called δ13C.

Similarly, carbon in inorganic carbonates shows little isotopic fractionation, while carbon in materials originated by photosynthesis is depleted of the heavier isotopes. In addition, there are two types of plants with different biochemical pathways; the C3 carbon fixation, where the isotope separation effect is more pronounced, C4 carbon fixation, where the heavier 13C is less depleted, and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) plants, where the effect is similar but less pronounced than with C4 plants. The different isotope ratios for the two kinds of plants propagate through the food chain, thus it is possible to determine if the principal diet of a human or an animal consists primarily of C3 plants (rice, wheat, soybeans, potatoes) or C4 plants (corn, or corn-fed beef) by isotope analysis of their flesh and bone collagen. Similarly, marine fish contain more 13C than freshwater fish, with values approximating the C4 and C3 plants respectively.

The ratio of carbon-13 and carbon-12 isotopes in these types of plants is as follows:[2]

  • C4 plants: -16 to -10 ‰
  • CAM plants: -20 to -10 ‰
  • C3 plants: -33 to -24 ‰

Limestones formed by precipitation in seas from the atmospheric carbon dioxide contain normal proportion of 13C. Conversely, calcite found in salt domes originates from carbon dioxide formed by oxidation of petroleum, which due to its plant origin is 13C-depleted.

The 14C isotope is important in distinguishing biosynthetized materials from man-made ones. Biogenic chemicals are derived from biospheric carbon, which contains 14C. Carbon in artificially made chemicals is usually derived from fossil fuels like coal or petroleum, where the 14C originally present has decayed below detectable limits. The amount of 14C currently present in a sample therefore indicates the proportion of carbon of biogenic origin.

  Nitrogen isotopes

The ratio of 15N/14N presents a characteristic distinction between herbivores and carnivores, as the movement up along the food chain tends to concentrate the 15N isotope, by 3-4‰ with each step of the food chain (terrestrial plants, with the exception of legumes, have an isotopic ratio of 2-6‰ of N). The tissues and hair of vegans therefore contain significantly lower percentage of 15N than the bodies of people who eat mostly meat. Isotopic analysis of hair is an important source of information for archaeologists, providing clues about the ancient diets; a terrestrial diet produces a different signature than a marine-based diet and this phenomenon has been used in analysing differing cultural attitudes to food sources.[3]

  Oxygen isotopes

Oxygen comes in three variants, but the 17O is so rare that it is very difficult to detect (~0.04% abundant).[4] The ratio of 18O/16O in water depends on the amount of evaporation the water experienced (as 18O is heavier and therefore less likely to vaporize). As the vapor tension depends on the concentration of dissolved salts, the 18O/16O ratio shows correlation on the salinity and temperature of water. As oxygen gets built into the shells of calcium carbonate secreting organisms, such sediments prove a chronological record of temperature and salinity of the water in the area.

Oxygen isotope ratio in atmosphere varies predictably with time of year and geographic location; e.g. there is a 2% difference between 18O-rich precipitation in Montana and 18O-depleted precipitation in Florida Keys. This variability can be used for approximate determination of geographic location of origin of a material; e.g. it is possible to determine where a shipment of uranium oxide was produced. The rate of exchange of surface isotopes with the environment has to be taken in account.[5]

  Lead isotopes

Lead consists of four stable isotopes: 204Pb, 206Pb, 207Pb, and 208Pb. Local variations in uranium/thorium/lead content cause a wide location-specific variation of isotopic ratios for lead from different localities. Lead emitted to the atmosphere by industrial processes has an isotopic composition different from lead in minerals. Combustion of gasoline with tetra-ethyl lead additive led to formation of ubiquitous micrometer-sized lead-rich particulates in car exhaust smoke; especially in urban areas the man-made lead particles are much more common than natural ones. The differences in isotopic content in particles found in objects can be used for approximate geolocation of the object's origin.[5]

  Radioactive isotopes

Hot particles, radioactive particles of nuclear fallout and radioactive waste, also exhibit distinct isotopic signatures. Their radionuclide composition (and thus their age and origin) can be determined by mass spectrometry or by gamma spectrometry. For example, particles generated by a nuclear blast contain detectable amounts of 60Co and 152Eu. The Chernobyl accident did not release these particles but did release 125Sb and 144Ce. Particles from underwater bursts will consist mostly of irradiated sea salts. Ratios of 152Eu/155Eu, 154Eu/155Eu, and 238Pu/239Pu are also different for fusion and fission nuclear weapons, which allows identification of hot particles of unknown origin.

  Forensics use

With the advent of stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry, isotopic signatures of materials find increasing use in forensics, distinguishing the origin of otherwise similar materials and tracking the materials to their common source. For example the isotope signatures of plants can be to a degree influenced by the growth conditions, including moisture and nutrient availability. In case of synthetic materials, the signature is influenced by the conditions during the chemical reaction. The isotopic signature profiling is useful in cases where other kinds of profiling, e.g. characterization of impurities, are not optimal. Electronics coupled with scintillator detectors are routinely used to evaluate isotope signatures and identify unknown sources. (one example - SAM Isotope Identifier )

A study was published demonstrating the possibility of determination of the origin of a common brown PSA packaging tape by using the carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen isotopic signature of the backing polymer, additives, and adhesive.[6]

Measurement of carbon isotopic ratios can be used for detection of adulteration of honey. Addition of sugars originated from corn or sugar cane (C4 plants) skews the isotopic ratio of sugars present in honey, but does not influence the isotopic ratio of proteins; in an unadulterated honey the carbon isotopic ratios of sugars and proteins should match.[7] As low as 7% level of addition can be detected.[8]

Nuclear explosions form 10Be by a reaction of fast neutrons with 13C in the carbon dioxide in air. This is one of the historical indicators of past activity at nuclear test sites.[9]

  See also

  References

  1. ^ Maberly, S. C.; Raven, J. A.; Johnston, A. M. (1992), "Discrimination between 12C and 13C by marine plants", Oecologia 91: 481, doi:10.1007/BF00650320 
  2. ^ O'Leary, M. H. (1988). "Carbon Isotopes in Photosynthesis". BioScience 38 (5): 328–336. doi:10.2307/1310735. JSTOR 1310735.  edit
  3. ^ Michael P. Richardsa,b,1 and Erik Trinkausc Isotopic evidence for the diets of European Neanderthals and early modern humans PNAS September 22, 2009vol. 106 no. 38 16034-16039
  4. ^ J. R. de Laeter, J. K. Böhlke, P. De Bièvre, H. Hidaka, H. S. Peiser, K. J. R. Rosman, P. D. P. Taylor (2003). "Atomic weights of the elements. Review 2000 (IUPAC Technical Report)". Pure Appl. Chem. 75 (6): 683–799. doi:10.1351/pac200375060683. 
  5. ^ a b http://books.google.com/books?id=W3FnEOg8tS4C&pg=PA399&dq=%22nuclear+forensics%22&lr=&num=50&as_brr=3&cd=4#v=onepage&q=%22nuclear%20forensics%22&f=false
  6. ^ James F. Carter, Polly L. Grundy, Jenny C. Hill, Neil C. Ronan, Emma L. Titterton and Richard Sleeman "Forensic isotope ratio mass spectrometry of packaging tapes" Analyst, 2004, 129, 1206 - 1210, doi:10.1039/b409341k
  7. ^ González Martı́n, I.; Marqués Macı́as, E.; Sánchez Sánchez, J.; González Rivera, B. (1998). "Detection of honey adulteration with beet sugar using stable isotope methodology". Food Chemistry 61 (3): 281. doi:10.1016/S0308-8146(97)00101-5.  edit
  8. ^ [1][dead link]
  9. ^ Whitehead, Ne; Endo, S; Tanaka, K; Takatsuji, T; Hoshi, M; Fukutani, S; Ditchburn, Rg; Zondervan, A (2008). "A preliminary study on the use of (10)Be in forensic radioecology of nuclear explosion sites.". Journal of environmental radioactivity 99 (2): 260–70. doi:10.1016/j.jenvrad.2007.07.016. PMID 17904707. 

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