» 
Arabic Bulgarian Chinese Croatian Czech Danish Dutch English Estonian Finnish French German Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Italian Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Malagasy Norwegian Persian Polish Portuguese Romanian Russian Serbian Slovak Slovenian Spanish Swedish Thai Turkish Vietnamese
Arabic Bulgarian Chinese Croatian Czech Danish Dutch English Estonian Finnish French German Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Italian Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Malagasy Norwegian Persian Polish Portuguese Romanian Russian Serbian Slovak Slovenian Spanish Swedish Thai Turkish Vietnamese

definitions - oeuvre

oeuvre (n.)

1.the total output of a writer or artist (or a substantial part of it)"he studied the entire Wagnerian oeuvre" "Picasso's work can be divided into periods"

   Advertizing ▼

definition (more)

definition of Wikipedia

synonyms - oeuvre

   Advertizing ▼

phrases

analogical dictionary

Wikipedia - see also

Wikipedia

Work of art

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  (Redirected from Oeuvre)
Jump to: navigation, search
Chinese Jade ornament with flower design, Jin Dynasty (1115-1234 AD), Shanghai Museum.
Beham, (Hans) Sebald "Die Nacht", engraving, 1548

A work of art, artwork, work or art object is a creation, such as an art object, design, architectural piece, musical work, literary composition, performance, film, conceptual art piece, or even computer program that is made and or valued primarily for an "artistic" rather than practical function. This article is concerned with the concept in the visual arts rather than music or literature, although similar issues arise in those fields.

Traditional media for visual works of art include: calligraphy, photography, carvings, gardens, ceramics, painting, prints, sculpture, drawings, photography or buildings. Since modernism, the field of fine art has expanded to include film, performance art, conceptual art, Welded sculpture and video art.

What is perceived as a work of art differs between cultures and eras and by the meaning of the term "art" itself. From the Renaissance until the twentieth century, and to some extent still, Western art critics and the general western public tended not to define applied art or decorative art as works of art, or at least to accord them lower status than works, like paintings, with no practical use, according to the hierarchy of genres. Other cultures, for example Chinese and Islamic art have not made this distinction so strongly.

The related terms artwork and art object, used especially in American English, came into use in the 20th century, especially to describe modern and post-modern art, especially in works without significant skill or craft in creating the physical object. Some contemporary works of art in conceptual art and other fields exist essentially as sets of instructions by the artist for the physical creation of the object, which is expected only to be physically created periodically—just as a piece of music or drama exists as a score or script. An example is Emergency Room by Thierry Geoffroy. Sometimes physical objects are transferred by the artist, but the work requires their arrangement in a specific form set out by the artist. In such cases the distinction between the terms is useful; the "work of art" has no permanent physical form, but sometimes manifests as a physical "art object." Equally a work of found art may not change its physical properties, but becomes art when so presented by the artist. In contrast a work of art may change the qualities of the materials concerned, as in An Oak Tree by Michael Craig-Martin.

The French form of "art object," objet d'art, has been used for much longer in English and usually means a work of decorative or applied art.

To establish whether a work is a work of art, the concepts of attribution, artistic merit and literary merit may be invoked.

Among practitioners of contemporary art, various new media objects such as the DVD, the web page, and other interactive media have been treated as art objects; such treatment frequently involves a formalist (or "medium-specific") analysis. The formal analysis of computerized media has yielded such art movements as internet art and algorithmic art. The purpose of "new media objects" is not to replace traditional media, but to challenge old media.

Contents

Art object

An art object is a physical object that is considered to fulfil or have fulfilled an independent and primarily aesthetic function. An art object is often seen in the context of a larger work of art, oeuvre, genre, culture, or convention.[1] Physical objects that document immaterial art works, but do not conform to artistic conventions have transubstantiated into art objects. The term is common within the museum industry.[2]

Marcel Duchamp critiqued the idea that the objet d’art should be a unique product of an artist's labour, representational of their technical skill and/or artistic caprice.[3] It has been argued that objects and people do not have a constant meaning, but their meanings are fashioned by humans in the context of their culture, as they have the ability to make things mean or signify something.[4] Michael Craig-Martin said of his work An Oak Tree, "It's not a symbol. I have changed the physical substance of the glass of water into that of an oak tree. I didn't change its appearance. The actual oak tree is physically present, but in the form of a glass of water."[5]

Some writers have long made a distinction between the physical qualities of an art object and its status as artwork.[6] For example, a Rembrandt seventeenth-century painting has a physical existence as a painting that is separate from its identity as a masterpiece.[7] Many works of art, such as Duchamp's famous Fountain, have been initially denied "museum quality", and later cloned as "museum quality replicas".

There is debate as to why "art objects" made by artists are valued higher than craft objects made by craftsmen.[8]

See also

References

Plasmaphone performance at ICMC 2007

Further reading

  • Richard Wollheim, Art and its objects, 2nd edn, 1980, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0521 29706 0. The classic philosophical enquiry into what a work of art is.

External links

 

All translations of oeuvre


sensagent's content

  • definitions
  • synonyms
  • antonyms
  • encyclopedia

Dictionary and translator for handheld

⇨ New : sensagent is now available on your handheld

   Advertising ▼

sensagent's office

Shortkey or widget. Free.

Windows Shortkey: sensagent. Free.

Vista Widget : sensagent. Free.

Webmaster Solution

Alexandria

A windows (pop-into) of information (full-content of Sensagent) triggered by double-clicking any word on your webpage. Give contextual explanation and translation from your sites !

Try here  or   get the code

SensagentBox

With a SensagentBox, visitors to your site can access reliable information on over 5 million pages provided by Sensagent.com. Choose the design that fits your site.

Business solution

Improve your site content

Add new content to your site from Sensagent by XML.

Crawl products or adds

Get XML access to reach the best products.

Index images and define metadata

Get XML access to fix the meaning of your metadata.


Please, email us to describe your idea.

WordGame

The English word games are:
○   Anagrams
○   Wildcard, crossword
○   Lettris
○   Boggle.

Lettris

Lettris is a curious tetris-clone game where all the bricks have the same square shape but different content. Each square carries a letter. To make squares disappear and save space for other squares you have to assemble English words (left, right, up, down) from the falling squares.

boggle

Boggle gives you 3 minutes to find as many words (3 letters or more) as you can in a grid of 16 letters. You can also try the grid of 16 letters. Letters must be adjacent and longer words score better. See if you can get into the grid Hall of Fame !

English dictionary
Main references

Most English definitions are provided by WordNet .
English thesaurus is mainly derived from The Integral Dictionary (TID).
English Encyclopedia is licensed by Wikipedia (GNU).

Copyrights

The wordgames anagrams, crossword, Lettris and Boggle are provided by Memodata.
The web service Alexandria is granted from Memodata for the Ebay search.
The SensagentBox are offered by sensAgent.

Translation

Change the target language to find translations.
Tips: browse the semantic fields (see From ideas to words) in two languages to learn more.

last searches on the dictionary :

5089 online visitors

computed in 0.062s

   Advertising ▼

I would like to report:
section :
a spelling or a grammatical mistake
an offensive content(racist, pornographic, injurious, etc.)
a copyright violation
an error
a missing statement
other
please precise:

Advertize

Partnership

Company informations

My account

login

registration

   Advertising ▼

24 HALLOWEEN Party Supply PICKS Food Cupcakes Hors D'oeuvres WITCHES LEGS (4.99 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Drew Struzan: Oeuvre by Struzan, Dylan (22.31 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Hors D'Oeuvres & Appetizers (4.0 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Sterlingcraft Oval Serving Tray - Weddings/Catering/Parties - HORS D'OEUVRE (5.49 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Holt Howard HORS D'OEUVRE Pixieware 1959 (159.95 USD)

Commercial use of this term

New MOTHER OF PEARL HORS D'OEUVRE APPETIZER PICKS Fancy (7.99 USD)

Commercial use of this term

A Book Of Hors d'Oeuvre Cookbook By Lucy G. Allen (4.99 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Martha Stewart's Hors d'Oeuvres Handbook (4.84 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Hors D'Oeuvres & Appetizers (Williams-Sonoma Kitchen Library) (3.97 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Williams-Sonoma Mastering: Hors d'oeuvres, Jan Weimer, Acceptable Book (4.99 USD)

Commercial use of this term

25 HALLOWEEN Zombie Party BLOODY CHAINSAW PICKS Food Cupcake Hors D'oeuvres (4.59 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Felix Vallotton Reproductions: Theatre de l'Oeuvre - Fine Art Print (13.99 USD)

Commercial use of this term

NEW Ornate Bamboo Fancy Toothpicks, 360 Count, Great for Hors d'oeuvres (5.35 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Ways of the flesh (Oeuvre de chair) (8.96 USD)

Commercial use of this term

12 Appetizer Hor D'Oeuvres Snack plates Meissmen Bavaria Fine China, Germany (35.0 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Hors D'Oeuvre: William Sonoma Collection (3.97 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Hors D'oeuvres (3.97 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Hors D'Oeuvres & Appetizers (Williams-Sonoma Kitchen Library) by (3.99 USD)

Commercial use of this term

Mikasa Silk Floral Embossed White Tea/Appetizer/Snack/Hors D'oeuvre Plate (8.0 USD)

Commercial use of this term